Category Archives: Sustainable.Green Interior Design.Recycle.Reuse

Sustainable Living through REUSE AND RECYCLING. Fair Trade Reclaimed Coffee Carry-alls (21’X30′). Green Interior Design.

FIND US:

FIND US:

Fall Out of Summer Fest (FOOS)

   SUNDAY – SEPTEMBER 21, 2008

   THE ARTIST EXCHANGE

Rear lot

      50 ROLFE SQUARE

CRANSTON, RI 02910

 

      FAMILY-ORIENTED   — FOOD     –MUSIC      

–FUN FOR EVERYONE!

      UNIQUE ITEMS JUST RIGHT FOR GIFT GIVING

      ITEMS FOR CHILDREN AND TEENS

      WELL-CRAFTED AND HAND-MADE GOODS

      ONE-OF-A-KIND TWINS SETS

 

DON’T MISS IT!!!

 

PROVIDENCE OPEN MARKETPLACE:

SATURDAYS —  SEPTEMBER6, 13, 20, 27 11AM-5PM Lippit Park — where Hope Street & Blackstone BLVD Meet

WHERE WE’VE BEEN:

WAKEFIELD BALLOON FESTIVAL — JULY 17-20

TIVERTON ARTS FAIR — JULY 18

CLASSICAL ARTS FAIR, SAKONNETT VINEYARD — JUNE 14

APEIRON FAIR FOR SUSTAINABLE LIVING — COVENTRY — JUNE 06

 

 http://members.bluegoosenews.com/nomowallysinthebag

http://members.bluegoosenews.com/nomowallysinthebag

http://nomowallysinthebag.blogspot.com/

Fair Trade Certified

Fair Trade Certified is a powerful logo.  It’s come to represent empowerment for farmers and for farm workers from around the world.  Fair Trade offers farmers once surrounded only by poverty a chance to develop skills necessary for competition in a Global Marketplace.

The products YOU buy today are directly connected to your future.  They effect how we will all live tomorrow with clean air, clean water, and with renewable resources. 

Fair Trade Certified products not only offer fair wages for farming families, they uphold rigid environmental standards, and offer consumers a higher quality end product. 

All of this is very good news for all of us — we receive high quality, sustainable products — and the standard of living for millions of people is raised simply because we made a great choice! 

When you see Fair Trade on the label you know:

  • Farmers and Farm Workers have been paid a fair price
  • Environmentally-Sustainable farming practices have been used
  • Respectful living conditions have existed
  • investment has been placed back into the community

Fair Trade products are harvested as:

  • Coffee   
  • Tea
  • Cocoa
  • Sugar
  • Vanilla
  • Rice
  • Fruit
  • Herbs

That, BTW, is the Fair Trade logo on the NoMoWally bag in the photo above.  (Crummy limits of size for the page).  See a better photo in the Media Library.

The Story of the Hole in the Bag

  “That’s how you know you got a great product,” Todd said.  The passion pooled up in his eyes like latte’.  He ran his fingers ran over the hole and poking through one layer of the bag.  It stirred up the jute in the sun and made its sweet scent drift past my nose. 

“The buyers,” he said a little more excited, “they have this…tool — kind-of like the guys who buy wine do when they’re going to test a keg.  It’s a long metal thing.  They stick it into the center and pull out a sleeve of beans.  If they’re any good, they buy them, if not, they pass.  Right then.  Right there.  Before they’re ever even roasted.” He gestured with his hands when he said “right then.  Right there.”  I knew he meant it.

  “What makes a ‘good bean?'” I asked.

  “It all depends.  Soil.  Temperature.  Water and sunlight have a lot to do with it, too.  They have to be just the right size so they’ll roast evenly, have just the right amount of oil so they’ll produce the right aroma.  They have to be ripe.  The ‘pick’ has to be clean — no stones, or leaves, or branches.  And they have to be the right variety in the first place.  When we say ‘Arabica,’ we can’t have something else floating through the cup, now can we?”

I shook my head, humbled by my ignorance. “I’d wondered what that hole was.  But I had no idea.  I just took my morning coffee for granted.”

Kermit’s Admission…

I was wrong...it IS easy being green!

“I was wrong…it is easy being green!”

The Story of NoMoWally’s in the Bag

Thanks for being GREEN, It really DOES matter!

 

The Story of NoMoWally’s in the Bag

 

  “Hey Russ!” hollered Mike across the quad, “You got a Wally I can have?” 

  Similar requests billowed from a windows and doorways time-and-time again as I strolled through the Harborside Campus of Johnson & Wales University during my ten year tenor there as an English Professor. 

  I caught up to Mike on that brisk Fall afternoon, steeled my nerves, and asked Mike, just what a “Wally” was?  He chuckled at my embarrassment — pondered the possibilities of very playing a very naughty practical joke on me.  Then, perhaps, he recalled his grade for the trimester had not yet been submitted….

  “It’s a BAG, Zan,” he said, “You know.  A plastic BAG,” he said sounding as if he’d like to spit at my lack of “hip.”  “I gotta’ do laundry.  I need a bag. We call ‘em “Wally’s.”  He shook his head in disbelief and walked away. 

  I finished my stroll across the quad thinking about this new form of college commerce.  Russ needed to shop. Mike needed to do laundry.  But the bags were everywhere…in the trees.  On the street. And in the gutters.  And it was Mike’s and Russ’ future — blowing in the wind. 

  It takes 1,000-years for one polyethylene bag to break down. Russ will likely consume 1,500 of them PER year* in grocery shopping alone.  And that’s not counting his renegade trips “to the Wally.”

  The bags have now been banned almost everywhere in the world, or there’s a steep price for their convenience, as a result.

  Sara Kite, the Recycling Manager for RI Resource Recovery Corporation proposes a twenty-five-cent fee per bag with a nickel credit when you bring your own.  Amy Rice-D-Portsmouth already has a three-cent rebate for those who bring their own bag in the works and added a five-cent tax for plastic bags to begin mid-2009.  Plastic bags are scheduled to be phased out by July 1, 2010.   

  And so, NoMoWally’s in the Bag was born.  Created from reclaimed coffee bags, real jute (an environmentally friendly and easily sustainable product), and reclaimed findings, all are one-of-a-kind items.  They hold up to 35LBS — That’s a whole trunkload of groceries and they pay for themselves in no time flat…just a few months.  Once you try one you’ll be delighted …they won’t shred your bread or your lettuce!!!  They’re perfect for the beach, for book bags, to keep a blanket in the trunk.  Tote your garden tools or camping equipment easily!  Dad won’t mind bringing a few diapers along because — well — they’re not covered with little bunnies.

  We hope to add rice bags to the line soon.

 

 

  *American Audubon Society

 

###

   Our pillows are created from reclaimed upholstery ends and findings from high-end interior designers and from real sails from vessel from all over the world.  It is salvaged before it was tossed into the landfill, and supplies are always limited. 

  Windbreakers are created from reclaimed sails from real vessels as sails are available.  Supplies are always limited.

  Our windows are deleaded, painted and sealed and sold at cost.  We can hang them for you. 

  Our coffee can  and other specialty container purses are perfect for Vegans and strict Vegetarians.  Some with bamboo handles and jute linings.